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BBQ Baby Back Ribs

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As a supplement to my post on spare ribs, here are photos of some baby back ribs, using pretty much the same technique.  The baby back ribs comes from the smaller portion of the ribs that are a bit sweeter and less fatty than spare ribs.  This photo set has pictures, as well.  I use a chimney starter to get the coals going, which is basically just a cylinder of metal with a handle and coiled grating on the bottom.  Stuff a few pieces of newspaper in the bottom and load up the top.  This keeps the charcoal together and gets it all ignited quickly and efficiently.  When the coals haved “ashed over” (meaning there is a fine layer of white on the top of the coals), you can dump them into the bottom of the grill.  Baby back ribs are a little harder to cook than spare ribs, because they are leaners and smaller.  This means keeping the temperature nice and low and checking them every half-hour.  When an individual bone comes free from the the rack with ease, get them off the heat so they don’t overcook and become dry.

Spice Rub

Spice Rub

Mesquite

Mesquite

Raw ribs

Raw ribs

Rubbed Down

Rubbed Down

Ashed Over

Ashed Over

Coals and Wood

Coals and Wood

Ribs On

Ribs On

After an Hour

After an Hour

An Hour Plus

An Hour Plus

Ready to Come Off

Ready to Come Off

This post is part of the Porcine Revolution.

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Grilling, Porcine Revolution, Ribs

  1. July 4th, 2009 at 08:39 | #1

    I hear often of chimney starters (thanks Alton Brown), but to see one in action is quite helpful. I also wondered how you kept the ribs from the high heat of the coals, but with your photos it’s clear that you pile the charcoal up on one side only. These look delicious.

    Anyway, I found you on TasteSpotting and am writing to say that if you have any photos that aren’t accepted there, I’d love to publish them. Visit my new site (below), it’s a lot of fun! I hope you will consider it.

    Best,
    Casey
    Editor
    http://www.tastestopping.wordpress.com

  2. July 5th, 2009 at 08:25 | #2

    Your ribs look perfect. I also just use a spice rub and cook them low and slow on a Big Green Egg.

  3. July 5th, 2009 at 13:32 | #3

    Ninette, thanks for your comment. You brisket on your site looks great. I will soon be in the market for a smoker and will take a good look at the BGE.

  4. July 5th, 2009 at 21:55 | #4

    @TasteStopping
    Casey, the chimney starter is great (and so is Alton Brown). It gets the coals hot in a hurry, and also helps you measure out how much coal you want to use. It also makes it easier to bank all the coals on the side of the kettle, so you can cook the ribs over the cooler part of the grill.

    I will definitely submit pictures to your site, I really like the idea.

  5. Michelle
    July 6th, 2009 at 15:25 | #5

    Oh - to have a grill and some space for grillin’. I will never forgive myself for selling Smokey Joe (my grill) when I moved to New York from Chicago.

  1. July 3rd, 2009 at 10:52 | #1
  2. July 3rd, 2009 at 15:01 | #2
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